Baited Remote Underwater Video (BRUV) survey of elasmobranchs on Bonaire’s reefs

Baited Remote Underwater Video (BRUV) survey of elasmobranchs on Bonaire’s reefs

Species composition, distribution, and relative abundance – REPORT

Sharks, rays and skates are suffering from habitat loss and are declining at a rapid pace, but knowledge of populations of many species is limited due to a lack of research. To learn more about these magnificent apex predators, the Nationale Postcode Lotterij funded the ‘Save Our Sharks’ project in the Netherlands and the Dutch Caribbean to educate and inform the public about sharks and rays, work together with fishermen and conduct research.

 

BRUV footage of Reef Shark Bonaire

 

In this research report, we present the preliminary results of the research conducted by STINAPA Bonaire and Wageningen Marine Research in Bonaire using Baited Remote Underwater Video (BRUV) surveys and citizen science diving observations on the East and West coasts of Bonaire. Caribbean reef sharks, Nurse sharks, Great hammerheads, Southern stingrays, Spotted Eagle Rays and Mantas were observed and many more observations occurred on the East coast than the West coast.

 

Figure 3: Shark species distribution along the coast of Bonaire. White circles indicate that there were no sharks seen on the BRUV video footage. Blue circles indicate that Caribbean reef sharks were present on the video footage, red circles for Great hammerhead sharks, yellow circles for Nurse sharks, and green circles for video footage that included Caribbean reef sharks (CRS) as well as Nurse sharks (NUS). The borders between the East coast and the West coast are indicated by the white markings on the top and the bottom of the island.

 

 

For more details on the methods, numbers and locations, download the report and read at your leisure.

Baited Remote Underwater Video (BRUV) survey of elasmobranchs on Bonaire’s reefs